All posts tagged: Medical Marijuana

A Busy Opening Week for Medicinal Cannabis

A sampling of Cresco Yeltrah products.

The first week of Medicinal Cannabis sales in Pennsylvania is complete, and it was booming.

In fact, dispensaries were so busy demand exceeded supply.

Cresco Yeltrah is the only grow facility which was able to provide products at the current time, and dispensaries went through their first shipment in 3 days.

CY Plus is a Cresco Yeltrah dispensary located in Butler PA, and was the first dispensary to open their doors.

Cannabis Legal Solutions partner Patrick K. Nightingale was the third patient served at CY Plus and consequently was also the third patient in the state of Pennsylvania to receive medication under the new medicinal cannabis law.

Here in Allegheny county, Solevo, located in Squirrel Hill (Pittsburgh) opened their doors on Tuesday and also went through their stock as well.

(At the time of this writing, both dispensaries should be restocked.)

Theresa Nightingale, Patrick’s wife and Chairperson of the Pittsburgh NORML Women’s Alliance, was one of the first patients served at Soleva’s dispensary, which is only a couple blocks from her residence.

Both reported very professional treatment and impressive facilities and the quality of the product was first rate according to the  Nightingales.

Prices were a little higher than expected in Butler, but this is probably a reflection of the lower patient population in that area of Pennsylvania and is something that will level out as more producers come online and the marketplace stabilizes itself over the coming months.

There are still some unanswered questions regarding medicinal cannabis in Pennsylvania, and over the next couple months, many will no doubt be answered.

One of the biggest concerns we’re hearing from potential patients is how having a medical cannabis card will affect gun ownership. It will not affect guns patients already own however, it does mean patients will not be able to purchase additional firearms.

The ATF form for gun purchases requires disclosing use of any controlled substance, including marijuana. Lying on the form is a felony, so we strongly advise patients to purchase any new firearms prior to getting their card.

Of course, the only way to change this situation is to reschedule marijuana from schedule 1 to schedule 2. Cannabis Legal Solutions encourages Pennsylvanians to contact their representatives in the House and Senate and tell them you believe the law needs to change.

The need is real. Twenty nine states now have some form of legalized cannabis, either recreational  and/or medical. Our elected officials can not continue to ignore the winds of change sweeping the nation.

Law abiding citizens should not be under the treat of prosecution by the Federal government for taking medicine that is legal in the state in which they reside.

The overwhelming demand exhibited on opening week shows there is a significant portion of the population who needs this important medication.

That’s a decision that should be left to patients and their primary care physicians, not the federal government.

We are rapidly approaching the inescapable conclusion that the Federal government needs to take action on this, instead of kicking these very real problems down the road.

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Vinni BelfioreA Busy Opening Week for Medicinal Cannabis
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Marijuana For Teens: The Thrill is Gone

Teenagers love testing boundaries. They enjoy courting danger. They are, in general, thrill seekers.

For some, the thrill of scoring illegal drugs is very tempting.

Most drug users will tell you there is a “high” in the act of just scoring more drugs.  There is danger, excitement, suspense.

Legalization of marijuana has removed a lot of that real and/or perceived danger from purchasing marijuana.

For starters, legalization takes away the profit motive for drug dealers.  Why sell marijuana and risk prosecution if your customer base can just go to a dispensary to get their stash?

Of course, teens cannot buy marijuana at dispensaries in the first place, but the same is true of alcohol and the liquor store.  Unless we missed something, no one is running a still that caters to the teen market.

Drinking alcohol is a social thing and is far more acceptable to society as a whole, which goes a long way in explaining why teens drink to begin with.

Alcohol is sold and consumed at a variety of gatherings– sporting events, concerts– and is advertised on television and in magazines.

This is not true of marijuana, even in states where is legal for recreational use.

There are no ads on TV featuring supermodels or characters like Spuds McKenzie, glamorizing marijuana use for impressionable young people to see.

Even where it is legal, public consumption of marijuana is generally restricted and more frequently, banned altogether.

Going to score drugs from a drug dealer is an exciting adventure.  Buying them at the store is rather mundane.  For a teenager, there is not much danger involved with standing in front of a liquor store asking adults to buy you a bottle of booze.

In fact, it’s kind of pathetic and not exactly, “cool”.

In states where marijuana is legal, and the black market no longer exists, the thrill of scoring weed is gone.

Perhaps this explains the drop in teen marijuana use in states where it’s been legalized. It’s just not cool anymore.

Add to that the negatives of smoking in general.

Teen cigarette use is way down from 20 years ago, in part because it’s been vilified as unhealthy and a nasty habit to boot.  Not smoking is way cooler than smoking to today’s youth.

Which brings us to Tide Pods.

Tide Pods have killed more people in the past 6 months than marijuana has in it’s whole history, and they don’t even get you high!

Yet we see thrill seeking teenagers eating plastic detergent pods simply for the thrill.

No high, no addiction issues… just the thrill of doing something, well, incredibly stupid.

Legalization for recreational use means no more dangerous drug deals in seedy neighborhoods. No more dealers battling for turf. Just a trip to the store.

No excitement there.

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Vinni BelfioreMarijuana For Teens: The Thrill is Gone
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Fentanyl: The True Gateway Drug

Prince

Lil’ Peep

Tom Petty

Delores O’Riordan

All were famous musicians… ‘rock stars’, as it were.

All of them overdosed.

Not the cliche’ heroin OD with a dirty needle in a seedy setting like so many rock stars have done in the past.

They were taking a prescribed drug. A drug that doctors apparently pass out with little regard for the potential consequences. A drug from which pharmaceutical companies reap profits that rival a cartel.

All of them are now dead and all were killed by Fentanyl.

Tom Petty, who was prescribed this medication for chronic pain from a broken hip, simply wanted to keep touring, and the pain was preventing him from performing. Unfortunately, the potential for abuse with any pain killing medications is a real concern. With Fentanyl, it is especially so.

Fentanyl is a highly addictive and extremely powerful drug that mimics the effects of heroin. It is regularly mixed with heroin because it is very cheap to manufacture, significantly increasing the potential profits of dealing heroin. The Federal Government estimates as much as 70% of the heroin they seize is now laced with Fentanyl.

And while the tragedy surrounding the untimely deaths of beloved musical icons is painful, it is a drop in the bucket of death when compared with loss of life among the thousands of average people who have died because of this scourge.

This is truly a problem of epic proportions for society as a whole, and it’s being caused by the very people and agencies who are supposed to be looking out for, We, the People.

Fentanyl prescriptions almost always lead to abuse, and once the prescription runs out, people who have become addicted often turn to illegal substances like heroin to fill their need.

Talk about a Gateway Drug!

And it’s FDA approved.

The Federal government thinks marijuana is a problem, but Fentanyl is okay.

The facts make this position untenable.

The arguments against legalization of marijuana are becoming increasingly absurd, bordering on delusional.

The government is playing both sides of the street, and they’re getting away with it.

The United States holds a patent on marijuana as a medicine for the treatment of cancer and brain trauma, yet marijuana remains a Schedule 1 drug, on par with heroin, because according to the patent holder, it has no medical efficacy.

We’ll wait a moment while you read that last paragraph again.

It can be fairly stated that at this point, the fox is truly guarding the hen house.

And meanwhile, thousands continue to die while the FDA, Attorney General, DEA and Congress continue to ignore the mounting evidence that Fentanyl is deadly and marijuana is truly the least toxic and safest of all recreational drugs. In fact, in states where marijuana is legal, the rates of opioid abuse have actually decreased by as much as 25%.

If there is a Gateway Drug, Fentanyl is it, and the gate keeper is the United States government.

This is madness and it needs to stop.

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Vinni BelfioreFentanyl: The True Gateway Drug
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Medicinal Cannabis: Frequently Asked Questions, Part 2

Now that Pennsylvania has begun issuing Medicinal Cannabis Cards to Pennsylvania patients, we thought we’d revisit some of the frequently asked questions we often field here at Cannabis Legal Solutions.

Q: Can I grow my own marijuana?

A: Absolutely not. Cultivation of marijuana is a felony offense.  Depending on the circumstances, Manufacturing with Intent to Distribute can carry penalties of ten years or more. A medicinal cannabis card is no defense.

Q: Can I use my medicinal card in other states?

A: Yes and No, depending on the state in question.

Q: Can someone with a medicinal card issued by another state use their card in Pennsylvania?

A: No. Currently Pennsylvania has no reciprocal agreement with any other state allowing for out of state medicinal cards.

Q: If I have a medicinal cannabis card and get caught with marijuana, will I get charged with a crime?

A: Yes. Possession of marijuana is illegal even if you have a medicinal cannabis card. Only products certified by the Pennsylvania Department of Health will be available to patients and they must be purchased through a licensed dispensary.

Q: What does it cost to be registered with the program?

A: Compassionate Certification Centers charges $200 for the registration process. The Pennsylvania Department of Health also charges a non-refundable fee of $50 for the actual registration card. Charges may vary from other providers.

Q: Can my doctor give me a certification?

A: Only doctors registered with the PA Dept of Health can make a recommendation. You will need a diagnosis for your medical condition from your primary care physician no matter where you go to get registered.

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Vinni BelfioreMedicinal Cannabis: Frequently Asked Questions, Part 2
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Medicinal Marijuana: Side Effects May Include Drowsiness and the Munchies

Watching TV last night.

A commercial comes on for some new wonder drug “which may be right for you”.

The list of potential unwanted side effects of this drug was long and ended with, “… and in rare cases, death”.

Wow. A medication which even in rare cases could result in death… Must be a serious medical condition, right?

Wrong.

It’s a drug that helps you maintain clear skin.

Yep, it must really be better to look good than to feel good.

About ten minutes later, another commercial about prescription medications comes on, but this one is from a law firm.

“If you or someone you love was prescribed blood thinning medications Xcelroco or Prodaxa…”

Yep, big lawsuit.

Now bear in mind, all these medications were approved by the FDA.

How many of these drugs have been recalled over the years? How many serious side effects have these medications been traced to?

These medications come about because a pharmaceutical company gets a patent on a new drug. They then do clinical studies and present that information to the FDA, which in turns decides whether or not to approve said drug.

Which brings us to medicinal marijuana.

Although there is a lot of research out there about the efficacy of medical marijuana, the patent is not owned by a pharmaceutical corporation that can do clinical trials and submit those results to the FDA.

The legal status of marijuana actually inhibits clinical trials as does the fact that the patent on THC is actually owned by the United States Government.

That’s right. The same government that keeps marijuana listed as a Schedule 1 narcotic (no medical efficacy) also owns the patent on THC for it’s medical efficacy in treating cancer and brain trauma.

Hence, no clinical trials are possible.

Sounds like the fox is guarding the hen house.

Meanwhile, the FDA is approving drugs based on clinical studies they actually have no hand in administering, and many of these drugs are wreaking havoc on patients.

Contrast that with medicinal marijuana.

Zero cases of overdose.

Zero cases of death due to toxicity.

Zero dangerous side effects– unless you consider passing out in front of the TV following a Doritos binge dangerous.

One thing seems certain; We’re likely going to see many more of these lawsuit commercials regarding prescription drugs.

Fortunately, it’s highly unlikely we’ll ever see a wrongful death medicinal marijuana lawsuit.

Maybe if someone gets too high and chokes on a Dorito…

 

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Vinni BelfioreMedicinal Marijuana: Side Effects May Include Drowsiness and the Munchies
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AG Jeff Sessions Hints at Marijuana Crackdown

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is back in the news as he makes threats against legalized marijuana.

Sessions won’t disclose what his plans are, but he has indicated his strong opposition to any form of legalization, medicinal or otherwise.
This news came on the heels of a statement from President Trump addressing the opioid crisis sweeping the country.

Sessions’ comments were wreathed in a smoke screen of scare tactics and outright misinformation. Despite a growing mountain of evidence showing that marijuana actually reduces opioid use in states where it is legal, Sessions chose instead to cite outdated reefer madness hyperbole such as, “It’s a gateway drug”, and the old tried and true fear mongering of, “What about the children?”

Meanwhile, states like Colorado have seen a 25% reduction in opioid use since legalizing marijuana and, equally significant, a drop in teen use of marijuana.

As far as the children are concerned, apparently Mr. Sessions has never witnessed the dramatic results of cannabis in treating seizure disorders in children. I guess he doesn’t care about those children.

The evidence being accumulated since the legalization of medicinal and recreational cannabis in over half the States in the U.S. is impossible to ignore.

Unless you’re a 70 year old Attorney General who places personal feelings over actual justice, or a grotesquely overweight Chris Christie.

The Governor of New Jersey is Chairman of the White House’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis.

Governor Christie last week called upon the President to reject any efforts to acknowledge marijuana’s promising role in mitigating opioid abuse and dependency, and ignoring peer reviewed studies showing marijuana has efficacy in combating opioid addiction.

The commission released the following statement:

“The Commission acknowledges that there is an active movement to promote the use of marijuana as an alternative medication for chronic pain and as a treatment for opioid addiction. … There is a lack of sophisticated outcome data on dose, potency, and abuse potential for marijuana. This mirrors the lack of data in the 1990’s and early 2000’s when opioid prescribing multiplied across health care settings and led to the current epidemic of abuse, misuse and addiction. The Commission urges that the same mistake is not made with the uninformed rush to put another drug legally on the market in the midst of an overdose epidemic.”

Reality Check:

“K” is a paramedic in the city of Pittsburgh. Because of the nature of her work, she asked we don’t use her real name.

“K” has 10 years of experience and has never encountered a single instance of a marijuana overdose. Her biggest concern is marijuana being laced with other drugs.

“We sometimes see marijuana laced with embalming fluid or PCP” said K. “Often the person smoking doesn’t know what they’re being given.”

The fact that 29 States have legalized some form of medicinal cannabis means there is a wealth of evidence being accumulated showing the efficacy of medicinal cannabis. Instances like “K” talked about shows the need for regulation, so consumers don’t end up with tainted marijuana.

Ironically, it is the commission itself using outdated information to support an untenable position in the light of the many peer reviewed studies that are currently available.

NORML has assembled a list of studies here:
http://norml.org/marijuana/fact-sheets/item/relationship-between-marijuana-and-opioids

We urge President Trump to reject the advice of his commission and allow States and the medical community to continue providing this valuable medicine to patients who need it.

As of last week, a new poll shows a record number of Americans now favor legalization of marijuana (62%) and it’s no wonder the public is coming around. In States where it’s legal, business is booming, bringing those States desperately needed revenue, much of which ironically goes to fight and treat opioid abuse.

President Trump is pro business and anti-crime. Marijuana legalization addresses both those concerns while providing medicine to people who need it.

Perhaps the President’s commission chair, Governor Christie, should check out the U.S. patent office, where tucked away in a file is a patent on THC for treatment of cancer and brain trauma.

The patent is owned by the United States of America.

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Vinni BelfioreAG Jeff Sessions Hints at Marijuana Crackdown
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Medical Cannabis and the Second Amendment – What are a patient’s firearms rights?

Patrick Nightingale testifying at the Pennsylvania State House.

Medical Cannabis and the Second Amendment – what are a patient’s firearms rights?
By Patrick K. Nightingale, partner Cannabis Legal Solutions

The issue of a medical cannabis patient’s Second Amendment rights is of great concern here in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania where we have a long tradition of hunting and sportsmen.  Now that physicians are registered and patients can seek recommendations many are wondering whether they will lose their Second Amendment rights or be required to surrender their firearms.

The answers are not entirely straightforward.  Under PA law a medical cannabis patient is not prejudiced relative to firearms ownership.  Under federal law, however, that same patient risks a felony prosecution under federal firearms law.  Any patient purchasing a firearm from a licensed firearms dealer is required to execute ATF Form 4473 which, as will be discussed below, does not acknowledge medical cannabis.

Does Pennsylvania law prohibit a registered Pennsylvania patient from owning a firearm?

No.  Pennsylvania’s medical cannabis law is silent on the issue of firearm possession.  Title 18, section 6105 of the Pennsylvania Criminal Code sets forth that certain persons may not possess a firearm.  Section 6105 requires a criminal conviction.  Simple possession does not trigger the prohibitions under section 6105 unless the individual has a prior drug possession conviction.  The majority of the offenses that are set forth in section 6105 are felony level offenses.  Certain misdemeanors are also included such as second or subsequent drug possession conviction, Prohibited Offensive Weapon, Corruption of the Morals of a Minor and three or more DUI convictions.  A person subject to a Protection From Abuse order or an individual with a prior mental health commitment is also prohibited.

Does Federal law prohibit a registered Pennsylvania patient from owning a firearm?

Yes.  Title 18, section 922(g)(3) of the United States Code prohibits any individual who is an unlawful user of controlled substances from possessing a firearm.  Cannabis remains a Schedule I controlled substance and the DEA and ATF have made clear that federal law does not recognize an exception for state medicinal cannabis patients.  A violation of section 922(g)(3) is a felony with a maximum period of incarceration of 10 years.  At present the Rohrbacher-Blumenaeur budget amendment prohibits the Department of Justice from using its Congressionally authorized budget to prosecute state cannabis programs.  Even if the amendment is not included in the final budget it is highly unlikely that the Department of Justice will utilize its limited resources to prosecute individual patients under this section unless the patient is otherwise involved in a more significant violation of federal law.

Can I apply for my Concealed Carry Permit/Must I surrender my Concealed Carry Permit?

No/No.  The right to carry a concealed firearm in Pennsylvania is regulated by Pennsylvania state law.  The authority to issue a Concealed Carry Permit is vested in the County Sheriff of the county in which the individual resides.  18 Pa.C.S.A. §6109 sets forth the process for a concealed carry application and the responsibilities of the County Sheriff in reviewing applications.

One of the criteria is whether the applicant is an “unlawful user of marijuana.”  A registered patient would be a lawful user of marijuana under PA law.  Section 6109(e)(xiv) however, acts as a “catch all” and prohibits issuing a concealed carry permit to anyone otherwise prohibited under federal law from possessing a firearm.  Since any user of cannabis, whether pursuant to state law or not, violates 18 U.S.C. §922(g)(3) an application for a concealed carry permit will be denied.

At the time of writing I am unaware of any mechanism to try and revoke concealed carry permits merely because a patient is registered with the Department of Health.

Can I purchase a firearm lawfully if I am a registered PA patient?

No.  Any firearm purchase from a federally licensed firearms dealer involves the execution of ATF Form 4473. In 2016 the ATF modified the form to include the following language in question 11(e):

“Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any other depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance?  Warning:  the use or possession of marijuana remains unlawful under federal law regardless or whether it has been legalized or decriminalized for medicinal or recreational purposes in the state where you reside.”  (Emphasis in original).

If a registered patient answers this truthfully the sale will be denied after a Pennsylvania State Police review of the form.  If the patient lies on the form in order to purchase the firearm the patient risks felony prosecution by the Pennsylvania State Police.

An ATF Form 4473 is not required for the purchase of a rifle or shotgun, but a patient would nonetheless be considered a prohibited person.

A recent Ninth Circuit case addressed the issue of an Arizona patient attempting to purchase a firearm.  The licensed firearm dealer knew the individual was a medical cannabis patient and denied the sale.  The issue went before the federal appellate court and the court held that the Second Amendment does not protect the patient where cannabis remains a Schedule I controlled substance under federal law.  The Ninth Circuit is not law here in the Third Circuit, but I do not anticipate a holding from out Court of Appeals that would grant Second Amendment rights without a change in federal law.

Unfortunately, federal law does not appear to be on the side of Pennsylvania patients.  A patient who owns firearms and/or possesses a concealed carry permit is unaffected by Pennsylvania state law but can easily run afoul of federal law if making a new firearms purchase.

For more information please contact Patrick K. Nightingale of Cannabis Legal Solutions at Patrick@cannabislegalsolutions.net

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Vinni BelfioreMedical Cannabis and the Second Amendment – What are a patient’s firearms rights?
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2017 World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo

October 20, 2017, Pittsburgh

Patient advocacy is the cornerstone of this event, sponsored by Cannabis Certification Centers, Greenhouse Ventures and The Healing Center.

The World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo was a well attended affair.

Dr. Bryan Doner (right) greets patients at the CCC table.

Ken Shultz, Dr. Bryan Doner (CCC) and Patrick Nightingale

We look forward to working with Compassionate Certification Centers as they help patients get the medicine they need.

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Vinni Belfiore2017 World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo
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Marijuana Arrests on the Rise in Pennsylvania

On October 17, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf announced the first medical marijuana grow facility is ready to start growing marijuana.

The PA Department of Health has approved Cresco Yeltrah to begin growing and processing at their facility in Jefferson County, PA.

Ironically, we currently have a case in Jefferson county which concerns someone who legally purchased a bag of edibles (gummies) in the State of California and is being charged with Possession with Intent to Deliver in Jefferson county– a very serious charge. Unfortunately Jefferson county officials are not as open minded about marijuana use as the location of a professional grow in their county would imply.

A marijuana arrest can follow a person their entire life, negatively affecting their ability to work, find housing and even to travel out of country.

While we see marijuana arrests declining in cities like Philadelphia, which decriminalized marijuana possession last year, and Pittsburgh, which has an unofficial decriminalization policy that results in a citation, the statewide numbers are increasing.

Between 2010 and 2016, marijuana related arrests have risen by 33% in Pennsylvania.

Even more alarming, African Americans are EIGHT times more likely to be arrested for marijuana than whites.

The fact is, usage rates among black and white citizens are about the same, yet the chart below makes it clear black citizens are being  targeted by law enforcement in a disproportionate way.

Source: American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania

Regarding the new facility in Jefferson county, the Governor said the number one priority is getting medicine to the Pennsylvanians who need it.

While we applaud the Governor’s concern for patients, we can’t help but wonder why his concern for the citizens of Pennsylvania seemingly does not extend to citizens who face life long consequences for merely possessing marijuana.

According to Governor Wolf, full decriminalization and or legalization is, “not on the table” at this time.

In light of this new data, and the fact that Governor Wolf has been a vocal proponent of more sensible marijuana policies, we would ask Governor Wolf to reconsider if maybe now is the time to move forward with decriminalization of marijuana.

This is not something he can simply sign into existence, but it is something he can and should take the lead on.

From a strictly financial view, a plan for legalizing marijuana could bring in millions in revenue for Pennsylvania’s empty coffers, creating a budget surplus that would benefit all the citizens of Pennsylvania.

From a humanitarian view, that revenue could be used to help alleviate the increasing opiate crisis here at home, offering treatment options and education for young people to avoid getting hooked on these very dangerous drugs.

When a group of citizens is being singled out for arrest, apparently based on race, there is a problem for all the citizens of Pennsylvania.

Justice is, after all, supposed to be blind.

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Vinni BelfioreMarijuana Arrests on the Rise in Pennsylvania
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Patrick Nightingale Hosts West Virginia Cannabis Seminar

Patrick Nightingale displays his medical marijuana card, issued by the state of California

The first ever West Virginia medical cannabis seminar was held in Morgantown, WV., September 30 with Cannabis Legal Solutions founding partner Patrick Nightingale hosting the event.

CLS is a proud sponsor of WV Cannabis Seminar

Although West Virginia’s medicinal law is very similar to Pennsylvania, there are some differences, most notably in that there are a couple qualifying medical conditions West Virginia does not include.

Naturally, there are also state and local laws in West Virginia regarding things like zoning that may vary as well.

In addition, the actual number of available licenses is smaller in West Virginia due to a smaller population in that state.

Ultimately, Cannabis Legal Solutions has the knowledge and experience to guide our clients through the process of getting licensed, ensuring complete compliance, setting up your business, including real estate and contract legal matters, and assisting with the legalities of day to day operations in both Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

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Vinni BelfiorePatrick Nightingale Hosts West Virginia Cannabis Seminar
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