All posts tagged: Patrick K. Nightingale

The Real Marijuana Problem: The Law. Part 1, “Tom”

The US Stance on Medical Marijuana is Confusing at BestThe legal status of Marijuana does far more harm to citizens than using it ever could.

The following story is true. The names have been changed to protect the innocent.

“Tom” goes boating with friends over the holiday weekend on the river in Middleofnowhere County.  He was excited because he had saved up his money and bought a new boat, which he was taking on it’s maiden voyage.

Pennsylvania Fish and Game officers show up and pull him over — we’re still not clear on what their initial reason was– but they end up searching “Tom” and find a whopping gram of weed and a small pipe.

Fish and Game officers policing marijuana instead of protecting Bambi and Thumper is a mystery to me, but instead of just issuing a citation on what should be a simple matter, they arrest “Tom” and the floodgates of potential life-long repercussions open wide.

Just getting arrested, let alone convicted of a crime, has immediate negative ramifications. Family, friends, and more problematic, employers, are all suddenly sources of stress.

Hiring legal representation, missing time for court dates, which are often rescheduled, further dragging out the process and the emotional stress for the accused and their loved ones.

Employers in particular are not likely to ignore an arrest, especially if there are security and safety issues at play.

A marijuana possession conviction automatically results in suspension of driving privileges and can carry substantial fines, as well as a period of probation. Worst of all, it stays on your record.  This can adversely affect employment options and even restrict one’s ability to travel abroad.

Suddenly “Tom” goes from enjoying a holiday on his new boat to facing a complete disruption of his life. All over a gram of weed.

All because of the law.

Does that sound like Justice to you?

In Part 2, we’ll talk about a young lady who could — with the help of the police– graduate from marijuana to heroin in a most unexpected way.

 

 

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Patrick NightingaleThe Real Marijuana Problem: The Law. Part 1, “Tom”
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Flag on the Play: Illegal Procedure

The legal system– justice– is built on the twin pillars of precedent and procedure.

This is why attorneys look to ‘preserve the record’ by filing various motions, even when they know they will likely be ruled against in the current trial. They are preserving points on the record that may in fact be incredibly important in any appeals that may be filed.

Procedure and Precedent.

The procedure part can often be frustrating for everyone involved, but the truth is, what you say in court proceedings is only as relevant as how–and when– you say it.

Court scheduling can often be a source of frustration for client and attorney alike. The courts in various counties throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania do not all operate on the same schedule, and the procedures can vary from county to county.

Courts schedule hearings without reference to each other, or attorney schedules, and they certainly don’t recognize the convenience of the accused. This is why there are often delays, motions for a continuance, etc.

This can be very frustrating for someone with a court date hanging over their heads. We hear it again and again: “I just want to get it over with.”

The wheels of justice often turn slow, but that is far better than hastily running over the innocent in the name of efficiency.

Of course there are always extenuating circumstances that the court will recognize– a death in the family, severe illness, scheduling conflicts for the defense or prosecution– and the courts are usually pretty accommodating with a reasonable excuse.

Recently, I was scheduled to appear in court at 9:00 am and later that day in a different court at 1:30 pm. Normally, that would not be an issue, but on this day, morning court was running way behind schedule, and it became obvious I would not be able to make my 1:30 appearance. This is where good relations with various courts can be a big help. The Judge in my early case had his clerk contact the Judge in the afternoon case to resolve the issue successfully (much appreciated, btw).

However, this left my client in the second hearing in the unhappy position of having to appear on a later date.

At times like that, I feel awful knowing my client is frustrated, but it was truly a situation completely out of my control.  The courts reign supreme when it comes to scheduling. In this instance, the early case was time sensitive. Our backs were against the wall, therefor the afternoon case would have been delayed regardless.

Procedure.

“The Cop Didn’t Show”.

Television shows have absolutely no bearing on the reality of the legal process. On TV, if the arresting officer doesn’t show up for court, the accused goes free. Not so in real life. (The same is true of, “They didn’t read me my rights”.)

Judges are extremely reluctant to rule against police officers in general, and an officer who calls in sick on court day is hardly thwarting justice. The presumption of the court is the officer is too ill to come to work. Period. They are extremely unlikely to throw out the charges, at least on the first occurrence. A subsequent failure to appear is a different matter. The Judge has a responsibility to maintain a fair process for the accused, and a second incident undermines the authority of the court to do that.

This is one of those times when a good attorney makes ‘procedure’ work in their client’s favor, citing for example an individual’s right to a speedy trial and moving to dismiss the charges.

Asset seizure and forfeiture is probably the single most frustrating part of a criminal investigation for everyone involved.

Authorities have the right to seize assets even without a guilty verdict. In cases involving illegal gambling, drug dealing, etc., the authorities will freeze bank accounts and seize property that they deem was either used in the commission of a crime, or was purchased or obtained as a result of criminal activity. Cars, boats, computers and of course cash can be seized with little or no recourse for the accused.

Even in the event of a Not Guilty verdict, the procedures for getting property back are extremely limited in scope and are often not worth the effort and cost. For example, a seized car was stored by the authorities for a year, and they charge storage fees that are often so high, it’s cheaper to just buy a new car.

This is an area that needs some reform. The authorities should bear the cost of storing a vehicle when the verdict is Not Guilty. An innocent person should not be penalized any more than the trauma of facing criminal charges and the costs of defending themselves.

These are just some instances of the preceedural part of the court system and are examples of why an experienced attorney who maintains good relations with the court system can be invaluable to someone facing criminal charges.

PKN Law pride ourselves on our knowledge of the court system from both sides of the aisle, as well as our good working relationships with court staff from counties across the Commonwealth.

 

 

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Patrick NightingaleFlag on the Play: Illegal Procedure
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Marijuana: Flying in the Face of “Equal Protection Under the Law”.

marijuana law reformWARNING: The following story might make you angry.

An epileptic woman from Michigan visits a relative in Pennsylvania.  She had moved to Michigan from Pennsylvania because medicinal cannabis was the only medicine that was working to alleviate her seizures.  Her husband is her caregiver, and he uprooted his whole life to move his wife to a state where she could legally take medicine for a documented medical condition.  That’s how much he believes in the efficacy of medicinal marijuana, based entirely on his own experience caring for an epileptic.

She has a medical card from her state of residency.  She has a medical condition that qualifies for treatment under Pennsylvania’s Act 16.  For her, in her mind, this is simply medicine.  It’s no different– in her mind– than carrying a vial of prescription medication in her purse.

Unfortunately, her original arrest happened before Act 16 became a reality, in a county where they are not prone to cutting breaks for marijuana possession.

In Pittsburgh, a small amount possession charge is a ticket. No cuffs, no jail, no court appearance. A ticket. Pay the fine and it’s done.

In many of the rural counties surrounding Pittsburgh, a marijuana charge can be catastrophic.  It can affect a person’s ability to get certain jobs. It can impact things like insurance rates and school loans. It often results in the loss of driving privileges. For a young person, it can ruin their life before it gets started.

In this instance, it’s penalizing someone for legally treating her legitimate medical condition, all because she’s in a different state in the same “One nation, under God”.

As was mentioned earlier, this was the original charge, but it gets worse.

Because the county elected to pursue this through the court system, as opposed to just reducing it to a disorderly conduct with a fine, they released her, but an appearance in court before a judge was required.  This meant the woman had to travel from Michigan back to Pennsylvania, all over a simple possession charge.

Unfortunately this woman never received her court papers. She thought they had taken mercy and dropped the charges, and so she never appeared in court. It was an honest mistake resulting from either a clerical error or simply, a lost piece of mail.

Missing a court date is never good, and even in what began as a minor offense becomes magnified and can make an otherwise routine situation much worse. It opens a person up to additional charges, and will result in the issuance of a “Bench Warrant”.

A Bench Warrant does not offer any specifics as to what the person was charged with, so a police officer who discovers a warrant will treat any such situation as potentially life threatening.  In this instance, the discovery of the warrant occurred in Ohio, where the woman had been pulled over in a traffic stop and she was once again found to possess marijuana. Ohio recently decriminalized marijuana, but because of the warrant, instead of getting a ticket and being sent on her way, she was arrested, taken to jail and held for over a week until she could be extradited back to Pennsylvania.

All because she had a small possession charge, even though she had a state issued medical card for treating epilepsy, which is recognized in Act 16 as a legitimate qualifying condition.

Fortunately the authorities have since realized this is a classic mountain out of a mole hill scenario and have released the woman to the care of her husband. But the story isn’t over. She still has to come back to Pennsylvania for another court date, retain an attorney, and spend even more money than she’s already spent.

What should have been a simple fine turned into a nightmare for this woman and her family that cost a lot of money for them and for the tax payers of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

All because of a minor marijuana possession charge.

Does this sound like justice to you?

 

 

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Patrick NightingaleMarijuana: Flying in the Face of “Equal Protection Under the Law”.
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Jeff Sessions Thumbs His Nose at Judge, Jury and Justice

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has taken a giant leap backwards in time by issuing a memo instructing Federal prosecutors to “charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense” in drug related crimes, reversing the policies of his predecessor, Eric Holder.

Holder took a more progressive and humane approach, especially concerning non-violent and low-level offenders. It was also a more pragmatic and fiscally responsible approach aimed at correcting over 40 years of damage done by the harsh policies of the past and the failed War on Drugs.

If Mr. Sessions wants to address the spike in opiate use, he needs to look at the alarming statistics showing the rise in heroin addiction is increasingly the result of using legally obtained prescription drugs like Oxycontin, and other synthetic pharmaceutical products designed to mimic the effects of morphine, heroin, methamphetamine and cocaine.

Maybe it’s time the Justice Department investigates Big Pharma.

Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed. — Article III, Section II, United States Constitution

Most people get their knowledge of the judicial system from TV shows like “Law and Order”, which bear little resemblance to real life. The ‘justice’ part is much easier to see when it’s laid out for you in a snazzy hour long drama. It’s a much more involved process for a jury in real life to reach a verdict. And it’s expensive. A jury trial can set the taxpayers back quite a bit, and the time involved can really back up an already overloaded justice system.

The ability of prosecutors to hold incredibly harsh sentences over the heads of the accused goes a long way to alleviating the expense of jury trials. It is a threat, not unlike holding a gun to someone’s head: Plead or else.

The above cited Section of the Constitution is a sham. An estimated ninety-seven percent of people in Federal prisons never had a trial by a jury of their peers.

This has increasingly reduced the role of a Criminal Defense Attorney from defender seeking justice and arguing his client’s case before a jury, to negotiator in a hostage crisis, trying to get the best deal possible for their client. We are literally forced to make our case to the Prosecution without ever going before a Judge and Jury. The deck is already stacked in favor of the Prosecution, and what Sessions is doing will simply make it worse and more likely to trigger mandatory minimum sentences–  rules that limit a Judge’s discretion.

And therein lies another slap in the face for justice: Intentionally limiting the role of Judges in the judicial process.

Having had the privilege of appearing before many Judges over the years, I can tell you they are completely competent to render a just decision without handcuffing them to arbitrary rules, doled out and overseen by a small group of people in Washington, DC., who are completely removed from, and literally oblivious to, the facts and circumstances of any individual case.

Mandatory Minimums essentially say the Federal Government has no faith in the ability of Judges to render just decisions. But that’s what Mr. Sessions wants.

Everyone in the Justice System should be concerned that Mr. Sessions is taking us backwards by instituting policies and guidelines that have proven to be a failure, going back to Prohibition.

Add the reality of a corporate controlled, for-profit prison system, and we have a recipe for disaster.

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Patrick NightingaleJeff Sessions Thumbs His Nose at Judge, Jury and Justice
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Medical Cannabis Convention and Expo 2017 Wrap Up

The first ever Pennsylvania Medical Cannabis Convention and Expo was held April 21 & 22 at David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh. The event was a tremendous success with over 2500 tickets sold.

Many visitors from Pennsylvania and across the nation gathered to explore the rapidly growing medical cannabis business landscape including growers and providers as well as support services representatives.

Pennsylvania Medical Cannabis Society was one of the sponsors and they had KDKA 1020 AM on hand for the first day of the conference with radio personality Mike Pintek doing his show live with special guest co-host, attorney and well-know cannabis activist Patrick K. Nightingale.

This was a great opportunity for those interested in becoming active in the medical cannabis business to meet with and learn from industry professionals.

Attorney Andrew Gross, of Nightingale, Gross & Patterson, LLC, said he is very pleased to be a part of this growing industry. “It’s very exciting to be on the ground floor in a business that can help so many people in need of medicine” said Mr. Gross, adding, “There are many legal and business aspects which need to be addressed by those intending to start a medical cannabis business. Our firm is providing those support services. Everything from entity formation and real estate acquisition/development to licensing and regulatory issues.”

Those who are seriously considering a medical cannabis venture can contact Andrew Gross at 412-553-0140 to schedule a consultation with Nightingale, Gross & Patterson, LLC.

We would like to thank everyone involved in this year’s conference and look forward to working with you in the future to bring this much needed medicine and economic development to Pennsylvania.

 

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Patrick NightingaleMedical Cannabis Convention and Expo 2017 Wrap Up
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The Applications Are In: Medicinal Marijuana in Pennsylvania is One Step Closer to Becoming a Reality

MarijuanaThe applications are filled out and submitted. The hoops are being jumped. The regulations in theory are becoming a reality.

Medicinal Marijuana is becoming a reality in Pennsylvania.

The growers and dispensaries are awaiting the results of which will be selected by the Department of Health to begin the task of bringing this valuable medicine to the citizens of Pennsylvania.

Children suffering from seizures will finally get the medicine they need. Cancer patients will finally have a natural alternative to pharmaceutical synthetic medication.

The ball is now in the State’s court. They have to stay on top of this.

For the most part, they have done a good job of identifying medical conditions that qualify under the admittedly narrow scope of the law, and it is truly a step forward for those in need of this valuable medicine.

One area where the State needs to be more proactive is certification of testing labs. At the time of this writing, there is yet to be any labs certified.

That said, there is so much more work to be done regarding full legalization.

Marijuana is the most harmless of all intoxicants, including cigarettes and alcohol. (Yes, cigarettes qualify as an intoxicant.)

Like anything that brings us pleasure– booze, weed, cupcakes– moderation is needed to maintain a healthy life balance and avoid the consequences of abuse.

Sitting on the couch all day smoking weed, watching TV and eating Doritos is not healthy, but is it somehow okay with beer instead of weed?

Is getting high and falling asleep watching Star Trek somehow worse than getting into a bar fight because you’ve had too much to drink and the Steelers lost?

The issue of abuse is no more tied to marijuana than it is to Hostess Twinkies.

It is time for we as a society step forward into the 21st Century and let go of the anti-marijuana propaganda of the past.

That is why Pittsburgh NORML is hosting a bus trip to Harrisburg April 19 to the Rally for legalization. Plus, on April 1, join Pittsburgh NORML for a LIVE Facebook broadcast at the Musicians Hotsheet Showcase at The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls.

Let’s continue to work for total legalization in Pennsylvania.

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Patrick NightingaleThe Applications Are In: Medicinal Marijuana in Pennsylvania is One Step Closer to Becoming a Reality
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President Trump and Legalization: What Now?

Since the election of President Trump, we have received many questions about how this could impact the legalization of Marijuana.

So far, nothing definitive has been said by this administration on the subject, and Trump himself has been ambiguous as to the future of legalization.

In the past, Trump has said that he feels it’s an issue that should be determined on a state by state basis. This would suggest his administration may continue the “look the other way” approach of the previous administration.

But what about our new Attorney General?

There is widespread concern regarding the nomination and expected confirmation of Jeff Sessions (R-Alabama) for Attorney General, as many people feel his confirmation does not bode well for the legalization movement.

Sessions has repeatedly made it clear that he is against any attempts to reschedule marijuana, and has hinted he would go after anyone breaking federal law, which ultimately supersedes state law.

How this will impact states where there has been reform is difficult to say. Will Sessions shut down states with full legalization like Colorado? Will he go after medicinal states as well?

At this time, we just don’t know.

Legalized marijuana, both medicinal and recreational, is currently a six billion dollar industry, and that doesn’t include California’s recent legalization of recreational use.

A majority of states already have some type of reform in place– medicinal, decriminalization and/or recreational use. Whether or not this administration is prepared to absorb the financial repercussions of prosecution remains to be seen.

Beyond that, the loss of tax revenue, and the overall economic impact of shutting down one of the fastest growing industries in the country, would give anyone pause.

And that is the one hopeful aspect of all this. President Trump is a businessman who ultimately recognizes a good deal when he sees one.

Let’s all hope “The Art of the Deal” is more than just a book title.

 

Click Here for a complete state by state listing for medical and recreational marijuana reform information.

 

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Patrick NightingalePresident Trump and Legalization: What Now?
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Police Encounters Are Not A Courtroom– Even When You’re A Pittsburgh Steeler

There is a show on Netflix, “House of Cards”.  It follows a congressman and his wife on their rise to power and the Presidency.

One of the characters, Remy Danton,  is African American and the Presidents Chief of Staff.  There is a scene where he gets pulled over by the DC police for speeding, and he doesn’t have his wallet, which is where his license, registration and insurance card are.  At this point, the police officer is OBLIGATED to investigate further and search the subject for weapons.

No identification, no proof the car is his– he could claim he was the Pope and it wouldn’t matter.  This is standard procedure and within the confines of the law.

Operating a motor vehicle without a license is illegal, and it’s perfectly reasonable for the officer to follow established procedure to investigate further.

As much as I hate to say it, this is one of those times when, if you have nothing to hide, you shouldn’t be worried or react with undue emotionalism.

It is ALWAYS desirable from a legal view to cooperate with police during a traffic stop, but in the scene, Danton overreacts and in the process, elevates the nature of the encounter, which in turn escalates the police response.

“I have a right to know why you pulled me over!” he shouts while disobeying the order to keep his hands on the car in plain sight.

This type of adversarial behavior constitutes a legitimate safety concern for the police.

In this instance, the responding officer is also African American, so when Danton makes a snide remark about impressing his fellow white officers, it just adds fuel to the fire.

Danton ends up in cuffs in the back of a patrol car, until a Lieutenant shows up and having ascertained Danton’s identity,  apologizes for the inconvenience and takes off the cuffs.

There is an implication in the way the scene is presented that since Danton is a well known political figure, the policeman’s response must be because he is African American, but this is simply not the case when applied to real life.  The fact is, Danton overplayed his hand. He could claim to be anyone, but the police don’t know that.

Under these circumstances, anyone without a license, registration, etc., regardless of race or status, would be subject to standard police procedure if pulled over.   The police had probable cause and followed the rules.

Which brings us to Pittsburgh Steelers Linebacker Coach, Joey Porter.

Porter was arrested Sunday night at a nightclub, and although we don’t know all the details, we do know that the police were called after Porter’s behavior towards the officer working security at the club became threatening.   It’s been reported that Porter may have put his hands on the officer– a major no no.  NEVER initiate any kind of physical contact with the police, especially when you’re a physically imposing presence like, say, a former NFL linebacker.

Don’t say things like, “I know my rights” or “Don’t you know who I am?”

If you are pulled over or otherwise have a police encounter, remain calm and speak in even, measured tones.  Keep your hands in plain sight and make no sudden movements.

If you have to reach into your jacket for your wallet, or the glove compartment for paperwork, ask the officer first.  “Officer, my wallet is in my jacket, is it okay for me to get it?”

Don’t tell them how to do their job.  No one likes that.  Cooperate with their instructions.  YOU know you don’t have a gun in your jacket, but they don’t.

If they ask you to get out of the car, move slowly and deliberately.  When they say, “Place your hands on the car and spread your legs” so they can search you, cooperate.  Even if the search turns out to be something that can later be suppressed in court, this is not a courtroom.

Police have a very dangerous job where any encounter can, in the blink of an eye, go from routine traffic stop to life threatening situation.  Of course they are going to be hyper-sensitive to anything suspicious, or worse, aggressive behavior.

Conversely, someone who is being stopped by the police– even if they have nothing to hide– is going to be nervous and anxious.  This can be a volatile mix that often results in misunderstanding that can escalate the situation far beyond the original offense.

The worst thing anyone can do in a police encounter is to become combative and or verbally abusive when addressing the police.

Even if they’re a Pittsburgh Steeler.

 

 

 

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Patrick NightingalePolice Encounters Are Not A Courtroom– Even When You’re A Pittsburgh Steeler
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An Open Letter to the President: Is Medical Marijuana About to Get Trumped?

The US Stance on Medical Marijuana is Confusing at BestDear Mr. President,

As of the time of this writing, I have been unable to verify the validity of today’s ‘news’ that the DEA is adding CBDs (the medicinal extract of marijuana) to the Schedule 1 list.

No major news reporting agencies have made any mention of it at this time, and although many independent and alternative news websites are reporting the story, it’s unclear if this is accurate news or simply an internet hoax run amok.

What is clear is the Trump administration is not shaping up to be friendly towards legalization efforts.

You have the power to end this madness, Mr. President, and with all due respect, your legacy will not be tarnished in the least. In fact, I would posit that such a bold step forward in the name of compassion and common sense will in fact reflect most favorably on you for generations to come.

Marijuana has real medicinal value. There is no denying that medical professionals in ever increasing numbers, and over half the States, have, in multiple ways, made the call: Marijuana is medicine.

Here in Pennsylvania, we’ve had an uphill fight that has resulted in 17 “Qualifying Conditions” for the medically proven application of CBDs in treatment– including the treatment of seizures, which are very often associated with children.

Forgive me, Mr. President, for playing this card, but yes: It really is about the children this time.

The thing is, I know in my heart you are a thoughtful, intelligent human being. And again, with all due respect, we know you toked a few doobies back in the day. It’s cool with most of us. The vocal minority of the present will be drowned out in the ocean of time. Justice will prevail.

My employment of the words, “minority” and “justice” are quite intentional, Mr. President, as I have spent my entire professional career in the criminal justice system, working both sides of the aisle, and I can tell you this with certainty:

Prosecutions for marijuana possession in Pennsylvania can be devastating for an otherwise law abiding, tax paying citizen. It can literally ruin their life. And worst of all, it falls disproportionately on the poor and minorities– those who can least afford it.

Meanwhile, in Colorado, “Light up!”

Now there’s talk of making the medically approved, medicinally effective extract of this most harmless of intoxicants, the equivalent of Heroin in the eyes of the law???

Constitutionally speaking, this is truly madness.

I am currently challenging the constitutionality of Pennsylvania’s Schedule 1 ruling in a case in the Court of Allegheny County. This is no “Lawyer stunt” Mr. President.

This is a case of someone resorting to making their own effective medicine for their own health benefits. This is medically documented and would be a “Qualifying Condition”, if the State of Pennsylvania moved faster.

And this is but one of thousands of otherwise ordinary citizens who face prosecution for doing something they could do in a majority of the United States, legally. If that’s not a violation of “equal protection under the law”, I don’t know what is.

The Schedule 1 status of marijuana is the roadblock in all this. The DEA has too much motivated self-interest to judiciously wield this kind of constitutional authority, and is, in effect, circumventing the States, the Constitution and the will of the people.

The experiment with legalization in Colorado has proven wildly successful, with literally none of the predicted negatives put forth by it’s opponents.

Mr. President, the time is now.

Add actual healing to your legacy. Add the compassion that I believe is in you to your legacy. Stand up for the truth and lead us down a path of justice for those who need medicine and compassion, not vilification and jail.

Please! Remove Marijuana from the Schedule 1 list.

Most respectfully yours,

Patrick K. Nightingale, Esq.

 

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Patrick NightingaleAn Open Letter to the President: Is Medical Marijuana About to Get Trumped?
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The Trials and Tribulations of a Legal Assistant.

Pennsylvania criminal justiceHello.

I am the legal assistant at PKN Law.

Translation: I’m a glorified gopher with some limited knowledge of the law who acts as a cushion between the ,legal system and real people, but I am not a Lawyer.

The legal assistant is there to take up the slack, and fill in the gaps, so the Lawyers can do their job.

Lawyers are like surgeons. They won’t raise expectations or coddle you. They won’t commit to an answer they are not 100% certain of, and that is rare.

(If your attorney says they are 100% certain, then for Gods sake, listen to them!)

Lawyers are there to deal with a legal system that is incredibly complex and represent their clients in such a way as to produce the best possible outcome. Period.

Having spent over a year as the legal assistant at PKN Law, I can honestly say they actually care about clients. The fact that I’m there proves it.

It is important to keep an open line of communications, and that is where I come in. I bridge that gap. It’s not easy, but I am proud to do it, because I recognize the importance of what we do as a team. We are the last stand between justice and injustice. We are the defense, relied on by people in very serious trouble.

I often have to communicate with family members of clients. They can be emotional, to say the least. They are scared. They are looking for reassurance that their loved one is going to be okay.

I wish I could tell everyone that, but I can’t.

What I can promise is, PKN Law will explore and utilize every possible way to defend their  clients in order to produce an overall defense strategy that results in the best possible outcome.

This is an unsolicited testimonial. No one asked me to write this.

The truth is, I had a rough week, and it occurred to me that we actually care about our clients, which is why I had a rough week.  We are fighting every single day, even though it seems like things are moving slow. The system is slow. It is frustrating, to say the least.

I’m here to make sure the Lawyers can do their job while maintaining communications with not just those we represent (our legal obligation), but also their family members (our commitment to service), who have very real concerns for the welfare of our  respective clients.

PKN Law is committed to providing the best legal defense and best service to every single client, every day. We’ll fight through the paperwork and legal jargon to provide the best defense possible.

I know because I’m in the trenches every day. I wish it was all smooth sailing, but it’s not, and I can promise you that we will be there to weather it all with our clients. That’s what I do.

Legal Assistant, PKN Law.

 

 

 

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Patrick NightingaleThe Trials and Tribulations of a Legal Assistant.
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